Reasons Why a Yearly Eye Exam Are a Good Idea?

Most people think nothing of scheduling regular visits with the medical doctor or their dentist in order to make sure that they are physically fit and healthy and that their teeth stay white, bright, and cavity free.   When it comes to eye care however they tend only to seek the services of an optometrist when they have concerns regarding their vision.  The truth though is that everyone should have a yearly eye exam.

Eye Exams Are Important

A comprehensive eye exam is more than simply checking your vision to see if you need glasses or not.  During a comprehensive eye exam your optometrist will check your eye pressure, your eye muscle coordination and both the internal and external health of your eye.  A comprehensive eye exam is especially important if there is a family history of eye problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or other health issues that could be affecting your vision.  Yearly exams are especially important for those suffering from diabetes as catching diabetes-related eye problems in their earliest stages may help to save your vision.

Your optometrist can also spot problems caused by your eyes being exposed to too much ultraviolet light from the sun, from pollution, or dust particles in your work environment.  They are trained to give you tips on eye care and things you can do to help protect your vision.

In some cases, a yearly exam may not be enough.  If there are specific eye problems that can cause a rapid deterioration of your vision your optometrist may want you to have your vision checked every four to six months to keep a check and make sure that your vision is remaining stable.

When you consider how important your vision is to you and all the things you would miss if you lost your sight then you will realize how important proper eye care and those yearly eye checkups are to you and every member of your family.

Exams For Your Children

When it comes to children proper eye care is also important and you should have your infant have an eye exam at about six months of age, again at three, and then starting when they are school age they too should have a yearly exam unless there is some reason why checkups should occur more often.

Children who suffer from undiagnosed vision problems often not only have more severe vision problems later in life but also tend to do poorly in school.  By getting yearly eye exams for your child from the time they are young you will be protecting their eyesight both now and in the future.

Make Sure to Do Exams Annually

If you have not had an eye exam lately you should call your optometrist now and set up an eye appointment.  Follow through with eye exams each and every year.   Your eyesight is important to you and the only way to protect your eyesight is with proper eye care.

If you are looking to reduce or even get rid of your eye glasses and/or contacts let us at Rohr Eye & Laser Center help you! We offer several types of LASIK eye surgery including PRK, AK, CK, Cataracts surgery and more. We perform all these eye laser treatments with state of the art equipment. We are a leader in laser vision correction, and our goal is to help you achieve superior vision. Contact us today or view our website http://www.michiganlasik.com/  to schedule an appointment.

 

 

Newcastle scientists eye-up cornea ‘breakthrough’

Artificial corneas have been grown using a new method described as “revolutionary”.

Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a process they say makes them fit better and offer better vision.

Lead researcher and Professor of Tissue Engineering Che Connon said this had “never been seen before”.

Cells grown on a curved rather than flat surface were “crawling over the dome in a lattice-like structure, similar to a pie crust”, he said.

The cells produced “large amounts” of aligned collagen in the same way it is found in a human eye, Prof Connon said.

“There were no easy ways to recreate it in a dish – until now,” he added.

The corneas, which are stronger and more transparent than previous artificial versions, take three months to produce.

The “breakthrough” could solve the shortage of donated human corneas in the UK, Europe and the USA, the university said.

The increase in laser eye surgery, which makes corneas unusable for transplant, has reduced the supply, it added.

The new technique also provides an alternative to plastic corneas, which the body can reject.

It could “revolutionise how artificial tissues are traditionally grown in laboratories around the world”, the university said.

The research, published in the journal Advanced Biosystems, was conducted with scientists from the University of California.

Newcastle University first author Dr Ricardo Martins Gouveia said the research suggested “we will be able to produce corneas that are more similar in shape and form to the natural eye”.

“We think our team will be able to test these in humans within two years.”

Original Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tyne-41685982

Original Date: Oct 20 2017

Original Author: Tyne and Wear

What Is There To Know About Cataract Surgery?

As we get older our eyes go through a process of aging.  You may first start to notice your near vision getting a bit worse and that you need to hold things a little closer.  Then you may need to start wearing reading glasses; this is called presbyopia.  This is where the lens within the eye cannot flex as well as when we are young and unable to bend into focus and the lens starts to get cloudy.

How Cataracts Can Affect You

As our eyes age further the lens becomes stiff, rigid, and very cloudy, this is called cataracts.   If not detected early, cataracts can get so bad you may not be able to see through them and you lose the ability to see clearly, navigate, distinguish between colors and lose contrast.

Ideally, before it gets that bad we would recommend performing cataract surgery to restore your vision.  The main aim of cataract surgery is to remove the old lens and replace it with a new artificial intraocular lens (IOL) to improve your vision.  A lot of people know about cataracts but aren’t clear on what the surgery actually involves.

Cataract Surgery

The initial stage of cataract surgery is for the eye surgeon to clean and numb the eye and to also dilate the pupil; this is to help the eye surgeon see the cataract clearly.  The eye is held open throughout the procedure with a speculum.

Most people are awake during surgery and anesthetic is usually given via eye drops that take seconds to work.  You shouldn’t be in any discomfort but may feel pressure and will see a bright light.  The surgeon will then make a minute incision, which can be less than 2.2 mm.

A substance called viscoelastic is introduced to stabilize the eye and maintain pressure.  The lens capsule is where your natural lens sits, the surgeon will open up a small portion of this to be able to remove the old lens and insert a new lens.  Depending on how bad the cataract is, the surgeon may first need to segment the cataract prior to removal.

The removal of the lens is called phacoemulsification (phaco), this is where the eye surgeon will use a machine with an ultrasonic hand piece.  The tip of the hand piece vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency which makes the lens substance emulsify which is then irrigated and aspirated out.  If needed, the surgeon may then polish the capsule prior to inserting the new intraocular lens.  The new lens is usually folded within an injector.

The injector places the lens within the capsule and as it unfolds the surgeon guides it into place.  The viscoelastic is them removed via aspiration.  Once this is done the eye surgeon will check over the eye to ensure everything is perfect and that the incision is watertight and then apply an antibiotic and steroid eye drop.  The use of stitches is not normally needed as the incision is so small and self-sealing.  The surgeon will then place an eye shield/patch over the eye to protect it and the surgery is complete.

After The Surgery

If both eyes need surgery they will normally be treated on separate days to prevent the risk of infecting both eyes and to also see how the first eye heals.  The surgery takes an average of twenty minutes per eye and you can expect to leave within an hour or so after the surgery.  Your vision should improve gradually over the next twenty four to forty eight hours.  Full visual recovery and achieving final outcomes might take up to four weeks.

If you are looking to reduce or even get rid of your eye glasses and/or contacts let us at Rohr Eye & Laser Center help you! We offer several types of LASIK eye surgery including PRK, AK, CK, Cataracts surgery and more. We perform all these eye laser treatments with state of the art equipment. We are a leader in laser vision correction, and our goal is to help you achieve superior vision. Contact us today or view our website http://www.michiganlasik.com/  to schedule an appointment.

The ABC’s of Cataracts

When Shakespeare’s King Lear calls on “cataracts” to spout during his “blow winds, and crack your cheeks!” speech, he’s not asking for cloudy vision.  In Shakespeare’s day, a “cataract” also means a huge waterfall.  This is fitting because the clouds of white foam arising from a waterfall are metaphorically like the cloudy vision caused by a cataract.  Roughly half of everyone who lives to age 80 will eventually get cataracts in one or both eyes.

What exactly is a cataract?  To answer that question, let’s begin by looking at the eye in more detail.  A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens.  The lens of the eye is right behind the pupil.  Light enters the eye through the pupil.  As the picture shows, the lens focuses light onto the retina, which is a layer of light-sensitive cells at the back of the eye.

The lens must be clear to focus light onto the retina.  If the lens has become cloudy with a cataract the image that is seen will be blurry.  People say that having a cataract is like looking through a dirt car windshield.

How Do Cataracts Form

The eye’s lens is composed of two substances: the first is water and the second is protein.  As we age some of the protein that constitutes the eye’s lens, along with water, can clump together, causing the clouding of the lens.  Although most cataracts are simply a product of aging there are other causes of cataracts, too.

Diabetics can develop cataracts and so can steroid users.  Cataracts can develop after an eye injury sometimes years later.  They can often develop after exposure to radiation.  Babies can sometimes be born with cataracts as well.  Other factors that could cause cataracts include smoking and drinking.  Here are the symptoms of cataracts, in case you think you are developing one.

  • Cloudy or blurry vision
  • Faded colors
  • Headlight, lamps, or sunlight glare
  • Halos surrounding lights
  • Double visions
  • Multiple images in one eye

Frequent changes in your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses could also be a sign of cataracts.  If you notice any of these symptoms, or if you are age 60 or older, ask your eye doctor to check your eyes for cataracts, as well as for age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, or any other vision issues during your next eye exam.

What To Do When You Have Cataracts

If you do have a cataract and it is interfering with your normal everyday activities, such as driving, reading, or watching TV, your cloudy lens can be removed in surgery and replaced with a clear artificial lens.  If you need cataract surgery in both eyes, usually the doctor will do each eye a month or two apart.

However, surgery should be avoided unless it’s absolutely necessary for your vision or if a cataract interferes with getting another eye issue treated, such as age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy.  Nevertheless cataract removal is one of the most common operations performed in the United States and about 90% of people who have cataracts removed have improved vision.

Prevention

Now if you don’t have cataracts and you want to forestall getting them, there are some precautions you can take, according to research done by staffers of the Mayo Clinic.  Get regular eye exams, at least once every two years or more frequently if you notice changes in your vision quit smoking and drinking alcohol. Wear sunglasses and clear glasses with 100% Ultraviolet (UV) protection.  Maintain a healthy weight and eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Quit smoking, decrease or eliminate drinking alcohol, decrease or eliminate eating meat, increase eating fruits and vegetables and you might live long enough to have your first cataract as a 95th birthday present – among other goodies.

Many people who need cataract surgery will get a temporary pair of eyeglasses to use that corrects the vision of both eyes, the eye that has the cataract and the eye that does not.  Then when they have had the cataract surgery in both eyes they get a new pair of glasses.

If you are looking to reduce or even get rid of your eye glasses and/or contacts let us at Rohr Eye & Laser Center help you! We offer several types of LASIK eye surgery including PRK, AK, CK, Cataracts surgery and more. We perform all these eye laser treatments with state of the art equipment. We are a leader in laser vision correction, and our goal is to help you achieve superior vision. Contact us today or view our website http://www.michiganlasik.com/  to schedule an appointment.

 

SMC unveils next-generation refractive surgery

Samsung Medical Center (SMC) has introduced the latest innovation in Lasik surgery technology called the “Excimer Laser EX500” with Contoura Vision, the hospital said Thursday.

Lasik— commonly referred to as laser eye surgery or laser vision correction– is a type of refractive surgery for the correction of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. For most people, Lasik provides a long-lasting alternative to eyeglasses or contact lenses.

Contoura Vision won the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 and was selected as a next-generation refractive surgery by the American Cataract and Refractive Society in 2016.

The corneal topography maps the surface curvature of the cornea by lasering 22,000 dots on the outer structure of the patient’s eye, and then the surface of the patient’s rugged cornea is classified by height and smoothness.

Patients with an irregular corneal shape as well as refractive errors such as myopia and astigmatism can be corrected at the same time. Discomforts such as light blurring or night vision deterioration, which is considered to be typical side effects of vision correction, is lower than that of conventional correction.

According to the FDA, the rate of visual acuity of 1.0 or better after three months has been reported to be 92.6 percent. 98.4 percent of the patients said they were satisfied with the results.

“The corneal shape and refractive index differ from person to person, and Contura Vision is a state-of-the-art vision correction system that is tailored to individual corneal conditions,” said Professor Jung Tae-young정태영 from the Department of Ophthalmology at SMC. “We expect it will improve the satisfaction of patients by reducing irregular astigmatism that is difficult to correct.”

Original Source: http://www.koreabiomed.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=1780

Original Author: Constance Williams

Original Date: 11/2/17

A Guide to LASIK and Laser Eye Surgery

What is LASIK Eye Surgery?

LASIK eye surgery is the most common type of laser eye surgery. As a relatively straight-forward procedure, LASIK eye surgery has helped to restore vision to those suffering from a range of eye conditions.

Anyone with eyeglasses or contact lenses will no longer need to rely on eyecare to see properly after undergoing LASIK eye surgery

How Does It Work?

This form of laser eye surgery works by using a laser to correct the irregular shape of the patient’s cornea (the surface of the eye). To do this, a surgical tool known as a microkeratome is used to create a small flap on the cornea, after which the laser is used to reshape the corneal surface.

As an irregular cornea causes light to enter the eye incorrectly, the surface must be reshaped during surgery to help make it more even, allowing light to enter properly. This restores vision and removes the need for eyeglasses or contact lenses.

Other Types of Laser Eye Surgery

LASIK eye surgery is the most common form of laser eye surgery, although there are several other options available too. This includes:

LASEK – Similar to LASIK surgery but designed for patients with thin cornea. While the corneal surface is still corrected, it requires a thin layer of tissue covering the cornea (the epithelium) to be temporarily removed to one side before correcting the cornea. A microkeratome isn’t used either, with a tool known as a trephine used to create the flap instead.

PRK – One of the first forms of laser eye surgery, it is not unlike LASEK surgery, with the main difference being the epithelium is completely removed rather than partially removed. This epithelium grows back naturally over time, although the procedure is now less commonly used in favour of LASEK eye surgery.

IntraLASIK – Almost identical to LASIK surgery, with the main difference being a laser is used to create the flap rather than a microkeratome.

Eye Conditions Treated by LASIK Eye Surgery

There are a host of eye conditions that can be effectively treated with LASIK and other forms of laser eye surgery. This includes:

Myopia – Commonly known as short-sightedness, the condition makes it difficult to focus on objects from longer distances. It can make tasks that require distance vision difficult, such as driving.

Hyperopia – Commonly known as long-sightedness, this condition results in nearby objects being out of focus. This makes things like reading small text quite difficult, and many sufferers strain their eyes trying to read, leading to headaches.

Astigmatism – A common condition where blurry vision is caused by an irregular shaped cornea. Quite common for those that requires eyeglasses, and the condition is caused at birth so can only be permanently removed through laser eye surgery.

 

Benefits of LASIK Eye Surgery

Most people will get LASIK surgery as it offers the quickest recovery period of all other treatments, minimising any disruption from the surgery.

Of course, the most obvious benefit is you no longer require eyeglasses and/or contract lenses. This is very relieving for many people, especially those with several types of eye conditions. You can do many things that were once impossible to do due to poor vision.

LASIK eye surgery – and all laser eye surgery – is one of the safest surgical procedures available. It requires no anaesthetic and is virtually pain-free, meaning you don’t have to spend hours recovering from surgery.

Michigan Lasik also known as Rohr eye and laser center offers 3 different types of LASIK eye surgeries. To find out which option works best for you, give us a call at 977-579-0202. We are an eye treatment center located in Grand Blanc, Michigan. You can also visit our website at michiganLasik.com

An Eye Scan for Alzheimer’s Disease?

Neurodegenerative diseases are tough nuts to crack, not just because of the inherent difficulties of sorting through what has gone awry, and why, but also due to a dearth of biomarkers that could help spot the diseases and track their progression. This inability to easily diagnose many forms of neurodegeneration means that the diseases can’t be treated early in their progression. The lack of biomarkers also hinders the certainty with which researchers running clinical trials can assess whether and how well experimental treatments of the diseases are working. A simple, noninvasive eye scan now being developed for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, may help address both shortcomings.

AD researchers already utilize amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), in which tracers are injected into patients’ brains to make the disease’s characteristic amyloid plaques detectable by PET imaging. But the scans are very expensive, spurring the continuing hunt for biomarkers. “What we now know is that the disease essentially occurs about 20 years before a patient becomes symptomatic,” says Cedars-Sinai Medical Center neuroscientist and neurosurgeon Keith Black. “And by the time one is symptomatic, they’ve already lost a lot of their brain weight; they’ve already lost a significant number of brain cells; they’ve already lost a significant amount of connectivity.” What’s needed, he says, is a way to detect the disease early so it can be treated—with drugs, lifestyle interventions, or both—before it’s too late.

So Black has been working with Cedars-Sinai colleague Maya Koronyo-Hamaoui and others on a different way of peering into the skull. “The retina is really part of the brain” and shares many cell types with it, explains Koronyo-Hamaoui, so it makes sense that people who have amyloid plaques in their brains might also have them in the retina. To find out whether that’s the case, Koronyo-Hamaoui has led animal studies that showed the quantity of plaques in the retina correlates with levels in the brain (NeuroImage, 54:S204-S217, 2011).

What we would like to see is extension of this data across different stages of Alzheimer’s disease, and how it relates
to other biomarkers, such as amyloid imaging.—Douglas Galasko, University of California,
San Diego, School of Medi­cine

In a new study, the researchers analyzed brains and eyes from cadavers of humans with and without AD, and found that plaques tend to cluster in a far corner of the retina, the superior quadrant, an area not typically examined by ophthalmologists.

To visualize the plaques in living people, the researchers had volunteers eat a chocolate pudding spiked with curcumin—which gives the spice turmeric its deep-yellow color—2 or 10 days prior to scanning their eyes. Previous experiments had shown that curcumin fluoresces when bound to the characteristic amyloid-β plaques of Alzheimer’s, and the team selected a form of the substance with relatively high bioavailability, Koronyo-Hamaoui says.

The researchers then used a modified ophthalmoscope to look at the superior quadrant in the retinas of AD patients, and compared the readings with those of healthy volunteers. Those with the disease showed twice as much amyloid-β–linked fluorescence in that area of the eye, the team reports (JCI Insight, 2:e93621, 2017).

This latest study is “an interesting and novel and promising step,” says Douglas Galasko, a neurologist at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine who was not involved in the work but has collaborated in the past with some of its authors. “What we would like to see is extension of this data across different stages of Alzheimer’s disease, and how it relates to other biomarkers, such as amyloid imaging.”

While previous studies from the Cedars-Sinai group have suggested amyloid-β deposition on the retina could reflect similar aggregations in the brain, “I think that this is much stronger,” in part because the researchers analyzed tissue from both the human retina and the brain, says eye researcher Bang Bui of the University of Melbourne who was not involved in the work. As for the scans of living patients, “I think it’s good proof of principle and certainly really exciting to take things from there, to go forward with this, and maybe to a larger clinical trial,” he adds.

The development of a simple noninvasive procedure using a device that’s already in wide clinical use is particularly exciting, Bui tells The Scientist. Koronyo-Hamaoui, Black, and two other coauthors of the study have founded a company, NeuroVision Imaging, that is now working on getting US Food and Drug Administration approval for the modified ophthalmoscope as a detector of fluorescence in the eye.

If further testing confirms the results, Black envisions people in their 50s and 60s one day getting routine eye scans for Alzheimer’s disease as part of their yearly checkups. “If we could potentially stop the disease . . . I think that’s a realistic possibility—that’s an excellent outcome,” he says. “If we could delay the onset of the symptomatic phase of the disease for 5 years or 10 years, that’s also a wonderful outcome.”

Original Source: http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/50620/title/An-Eye-Scan-for-Alzheimer-s-Disease-/

Original Date: Nov 1 2017

Original Author: Shawna Williams

Reducing risk for eye stroke

When people think of strokes, they immediately think of an abnormality occurring in the brain.

However, it can happen in the eyes too. This type of stroke is referred to as retinal artery occlusion or stroke of the eye.

Stroke of the eye is a frightening condition that causes people to lose vision in one eye in a matter of hours or days.

It strikes up to 6,000 people a year in the United States, according to the National Institutes of Health.

A stroke affecting the eye is a blockage in the blood vessels in your retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye.

“This can happen due to certain risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, glaucoma, small optic nerve ratio and many other things,” said optometrist Dr. Ashley Setterberg.

The most common symptom of a stroke affecting the eye is a sudden painless vision loss.

“So it can start and gradually increase over hours to days. You can have floaters which are small gray spots floating around in your vision. You can have blurry vision, which steadily worsens in one section of your field of vision or all of one eye. And you can have complete vision loss that can occur suddenly, or gradually over time,” said Setterberg.

While it may not always be possible to prevent eye strokes from occurring, there are a few things you can do to help decrease the chances of having one.

“We can see quite a few symptoms from a regular dilated eye exam, fundus photos, and other special testing. There are different treatments, such as injections into the eye, eylea  steroids, and even anti-blood clotting agents. It is very important  to have these annual eye exams, so we can catch any signs that may be a precursor to it or a risk factor,”said Setterberg.

Experiencing a sudden loss of vision can be a scary situation. If you or anyone you know happens to find themselves experiencing vision loss possibly caused by an eye stroke, seek medical attention immediately.

A cerebral stroke, which affects blood flow to the brain, can also cause sudden vision loss or changes in vision. For this reason, any sudden changes to vision require emergency medical attention.
The longer any stroke is left untreated, the more likely it is that the affected organs will be permanently damaged.

Who Is At Risk for a Stroke Affecting the Eye?
Men are more likely to have a stroke involving the eye than women. The disease is most commonly found in people in their 60s. Having certain diseases increases your risk of an eye stroke. These include:

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure; and
  • Narrowing of the carotid or neck artery

Most people know that high blood pressure and other vascular diseases pose risks to overall health, but many may not know that high blood pressure can affect vision by damaging the arteries in the eye.

Eye stroke symptoms:
Floaters – Small gray spots floating around in your field of vision. Floaters occur when blood and other fluids leak and then clump up in the fluid inside the eye.

Pain or pressure – Can signal a problem with the eye, however, true eye strokes are often painless.

Blurry vision – Steadily worsens in one section of your field of vision or all of one eye.

Complete vision loss – Can occur suddenly, or gradually over time.

Prevention tips for stroke of the eye:
Properly manage your diabetes – Keep glucose levels in ideal ranges as set by your doctor.

Treat your glaucoma – This condition raises intraocular pressure, increasing your risk for eye stroke. Follow the treatment plan as prescribed by your doctor to avoid any possible complication.

Control blood pressure – Poorly controlled blood pressure is a major risk factor for the contribution of eye strokes, therefore, keeping blood pressure controlled with diet and exercise, plus any prescribed medications, will help a great deal.

Manage cholesterol levels – Diet and exercise will help reduce levels in addition to any prescribed medication.

Original Source: http://www.kristv.com/story/36677114/reducing-risk-for-eye-stroke

Original Date: Oct 25 2017

Original Author: Roland Rodriguez

Dyslexia link to eye spots confusing brain, say scientists

French scientists say they may have found a potential cause of dyslexia which could be treatable, hidden in tiny cells in the human eye.

In a small study they found that most dyslexics had dominant round spots in both eyes – rather than in just one – leading to blurring and confusion.

UK experts said the research was “very exciting” and highlighted the link between vision and dyslexia.

But they said not all dyslexics were likely to have the same problem.

People with dyslexia have difficulties learning to read, spell or write despite normal intelligence.

Often letters appear to move around and get in the wrong order and dyslexic people can have problems distinguishing left from right.

Human beings have a dominant eye in the same way that people have a dominant left or right hand.

Shape of spots

In the University of Rennes study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, scientists looked into the eyes of 30 non-dyslexics and 30 dyslexics.

They discovered differences in the shape of spots deep in the eye where red, green and blue cones – responsible for colour – are located.

In non-dyslexics, they found that the blue cone-free spot in one eye was round and in the other eye it was oblong or unevenly shaped, making the round one more dominant.

But in dyslexic people, both eyes had the same round-shaped spot, which meant neither eye was dominant.

This would result in the brain being confused by two slightly different images from the eyes.

Researchers Guy Ropars and Albert le Floch said this lack of asymmetry “might be the biological and anatomical basis of reading and spelling disabilities”.

They added: “For dyslexic students, their two eyes are equivalent and their brain has to successively rely on the two slightly different versions of a given visual scene.”

No single cause

Prof John Stein, dyslexia expert and emeritus professor in neuroscience at the University of Oxford, said having a dominant spot in one eye meant there were better connections between the two sides of the brain and therefore clearer vision.

He said the study was “really interesting” because it stressed the importance of eye dominance in reading.

But he said the research gave no indication of why these differences occurred in some people’s eyes.

He said the French test appeared to be more objective than current tests, but was unlikely to explain everyone’s dyslexia.

Dyslexia is usually an inherited condition which affects 10% of the population, but environmental factors are also thought to play a role.

“No one problem is necessary to get dyslexia and no one problem is behind it,” Prof Stein said.

Original Article: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41666320

Eye Conditions And How To Solve Them

Because scleroderma is an autoimmune disease that affects connective tissue, symptoms and complications can appear in any part of the body, including the eyes. We’ve put together a list of some of the most common eye complications experienced by people living with scleroderma, with help from the Arthritis Foundation and sclero.org.

Dry Eye Syndrome
Dry eye syndrome or keratitis sicca is where the eyes are unable to maintain a healthy film of tears, which is essential for keeping the eyes lubricated and protecting them from dust. The eyes become very dry and sore and vision may be affected, typically becoming blurred. Without the film of tears, the retinas can become damaged and the eyes are more prone to infection.

The condition can be caused by scleroderma itself or some of the medications used to treat the symptoms of the disease. Changing medications or using false tears (eye drops) can help relieve the problem.

Retinal Vascular Occlusion
Retinal vascular occlusion is where the small blood vessels surrounding the retina become blocked. These thin arteries can become backed up just like the larger blood vessels in the body. Vision problems occur and patients experience a sensation of a curtain coming down over the eye — which can come and go or happen suddenly.

Damage can be permanent but sometimes the veins can be treated with laser eye surgery to relieve the surrounding inflammation and allow better blood flow.

Autoimmune Uveitis and Iritis
Uveitis is an inflammation of the layer of the eye between the retina and white of the eye (sclera). The most common form of uveitis is iritis, also known as inflammation of the iris.

According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms include eye pain, redness, blurred vision, seeing dark floating spots, decreased vision and light sensitivity. Anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive medications may be prescribed to treat the condition.

Glaucoma
Glaucoma is the term for eye diseases where the optic nerve becomes damaged due to high pressure inside the eye. Often without any symptoms, glaucoma gradually decreases vision and may be brought on by high blood pressure or reduced blood flow to the optic nerve.

Regular eye exams are crucial to spot glaucoma early, as it can lead to blindness if left untreated. Eye drops are usually prescribed to increase the outflow or production of fluid in the eye, laser eye surgery is also an option according to the Mayo Clinic.

Scleroderma News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Original Source: https://sclerodermanews.com/2017/09/19/ways-scleroderma-can-affect-eyes/

Original Date: Sept 19 2017

Original Author: Wendy Henderson