Monthly Archives: February 2018

Why I changed what I tell patients about refractive surgery

Consultation discussion should evolve just like laser technology has evolved

In the contact lens-only group, 54 percent of contact lens wearers responded after three years they “strongly agree” with the statement, “I would recommend my current method of vision correction to a close friend or relative.” This compares to the two LASIK groups in which 88 percent of those who previously wore contact lenses and 77 percent of those who previously wore glasses responded they would “strongly” recommend LASIK.

About 1 percent of respondents in each group at each time period responded they “strongly disagree” with the statement, “I would recommend my current method of vision correction to a close friend or relative.”

Researchers also surveyed subjects about night driving, starbursts, dry eye, and eye infections. In the contact lenses-only group, the percentage of patients who respond they had no difficulty driving at night remained virtually the same over three years. Some 36 percent of respondents had no night driving difficulty at baseline, and 37 percent had none at three years.

For the contact lens to LASIK group, 60 percent had no problems driving at night at baseline; at the three-year mark more than 60 percent had no night driving problems. Glasses wearers who did not suffer from night driving problems improved from 44 percent to 57 percent. As compared to contact lens wearers, LASIK patients reported better vision while driving at night.

Dryness happens

Dry eyes are the most common side effect of LASIK, but opinions of patients who have had LASIK vary about the dryness of their eyes three years after surgery.5 The control group remained the same from baseline to the three-year reporting period with 29 percent indicating they do not feel dry at all. In the contact lens group, there was improvement from 44 percent not feeling dry eye at baseline to 50 percent at three years. The glasses group went from 51 percent to 42 percent at three years and significantly fewer patients reported dryness than the group who remained in contact lenses.

For both the contact lens-only group and the contact lens to LASIK group, 1 percent reported feeling dry “all the time” at all reporting periods. For the cohort of patients, patients who felt the driest in their contact lenses did not have surgery. After surgery, the LASIK patients felt better than the contact lens patients.

When asked about experiencing eye infections in the past year, 8 percent of contact lens-only patients and 3 percent of both LASIK groups said yes. A similar trend was shown for questions about ulcer and abrasion. The risk of an eye infection is low but appears less likely with LASIK over time.

Ask the right questions

Laser vision correction is not for everyone, and eye surgery may be scary for many patients. It is worth your time and a benefit to your patient to ask, “What are you fearful of with surgery?” I ask this question often, and the most common answer is, “I do not know, it is just scary.”

New technology has reduced the risks and complications of laser vision correction. Understanding a patient’s subjective symptoms of glare, halos, night driving, and dryness before surgery go a long way in determining what symptoms will be after surgery. Ask your patients the right questions when they inquire about surgery—it will help to deliver “20/happy” patients.

Original Date: January 29, 2018
By Jim Owen, OD, MBA, FAAO

What is Myopia and What are the Correction Options?

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is the most common refractive error of the eye a situation where the eye does not refract light or bend properly to a single focus to view images clearly. In this case, close or near objects look clear while there is poor distance vision which causes distant objects to appear blurry. However, myopia is not an eye disease, but an eye focusing disorder.

Although myopia has a genetic link, its effect is usually more driven by environmental stress associated with near work such as computer use, reading, hand games, and a lack of quality outdoor time. In fact, an increasing cause of myopia is because of the adaptation of the eyes to prolonged periods of near work. Therefore, myopia is referred to as a “nearsighted” disorder one that impacts between 25-40 percent of the total U.S. population today.

Myopia – Correction Options

Myopia is a major health concern today with increasing prevalence over time. The main correction or treatment options include the use of glasses, contact lenses, and LASIK surgery.

Glasses

The use of glasses is the most common correction option for myopia especially with children. Correction glasses correct the angle through which light hits the retina. An eye doctor, ophthalmologist or optometrist, is best placed to examine your eye, testing your vision with the use of focus exercises and eye charts to arrive at the exact prescription for the disorder.

Contact Lenses

Eye examinations and vision tests are also used to determine the exact lens prescription for a patient just as they do for glasses. The mechanism of operation of contact lenses is like that of glasses they change the direction through which light enters the eye. However, contact lenses are immensely thinner than glasses due to their proximity to the cornea. There are two different types of contact lenses, soft lenses, and rigid gas-permeable lenses.

Soft Lenses

Soft lenses are designed with flexible soft plastic that allows it to adhere to the eye surface easily. Soft lenses cover a large portion of the eye including the iris, pupil, and even extending to the white. While some soft contact lenses are designed to be worn for a specified period before they are disposed, others can be taken out after use, cleaned, and stored properly overnight for use again.

Rigid gas-permeable Contact Lenses

In comparison to soft lenses, rigid lenses are a lot smaller covering the pupil and slightly extending into the iris. Rigid lenses are made of a thin rigid plastic and they float on the eye tears like soft lenses, while oxygen passes through the lens to the eye surface. It may become necessary to clean the lenses when an eyelash or dust particle gets between the eye and the contact lens.

LASIK (Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) Surgery

Although contact lenses and eye glasses are myopia correction options, they are only temporary. Distant objects would still appear blurry if you are not using them. Laser surgery on the other hand, is a permanent myopia correction option which does not require any daily cleaning or corrections. It is the most common refractive error treatment option which adjusts the shape of the cornea to allow passage of light through it, while light hits the retina just at the right angle.

If you are looking to reduce or even get rid of your eye glasses and/or contacts let us at Rohr Eye & Laser Center help you! We offer several types of LASIK eye surgery including PRK, AK, CK, Cataracts surgery and more. We perform all these eye laser treatments with state of the art equipment. We are a leader in laser vision correction, and our goal is to help you achieve superior vision. Contact us today or view our website http://www.michiganlasik.com/  to schedule an appointment.

 

Too Young for LASIK? Children can use a Contact Lens Alternative.

Glasses and contact lenses can imped a person’s ability to enjoy many activities, especially for children. Running, swimming, and playing sports can be difficult if wearing glasses or contacts, and while LASIK (laser in-situ keratomileusis) is often a perfect solution to these issues, children can not have the procedure until they are older than 18 years of age.

“In order to qualify for LASIK, we want our patients to be at least 18 and have had a stable prescription for one year, so children spend their childhood hampered with glasses or contact lenses. But this doesn’t have to be the case,” said Marc S. Werner, M.D., one of the experienced ophthalmologists at Stahl Eyecare Experts on Long Island and in New York City. “Parents complain that their child loses or breaks their glasses, or is uncomfortable in their contacts, and believe there is no other option available. There is – it’s CRT (Ortho-K) Orthokeratology. Your child can wear a specially designed therapeutic lens at night while sleeping to reduce astigmatism or nearsightedness by reshaping the corneal surface.”

CRT is a non-surgical method of vision correction that allows patients to experience clear vision without the use of glasses or contact lenses throughout the day. After wearing the therapeutic lens at night, they remove the lens in the morning and experience clear, natural vision for the full day. “Orthokeratology has also been shown to slow the progression of myopia in children, meaning their prescription doesn’t change as quickly,” added Werner. “At our office, we use Paragon’s FDA approved specially designed oxygen permeable contact lenses to reshape the eye. Improvement in vision is seen within the first few days of initiating treatment and patients achieve optimal vision within 10 to 14 days.”

CRT lenses are similar in size to a soft contact lens and are not any more difficult to insert or remove. Since these lenses are worn while sleeping, they eliminate any discomfort one may experience with contact lenses worn during the day. CRT is also completely reversible, so when the child is old enough they can easily have LASIK surgery to permanently correct their vision.

The doctors at Stahl are truly experts in the fields of ophthalmology and LASIK — they have performed more than 50,000 procedures throughout Long Island and in the five boroughs of New York City, and Stahl Eyecare Experts has been on the cutting edge of ophthalmology for more than 50 years. For more information on CRT and LASIK surgery for children, visit http://www.stahlny.com.

Original Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/02/prweb15209810.htm

Original Date: Feb 15 2018

Is LASIK Safe For Seniors?

If you have some or a combination of the most common eye annoyances such as blurry vision, spots or night glares, then it is worth seeing an eye doctor or an optometrist who will examine your eyes for both vision and health problems. In some cases, eye doctors may provide low vision care or vision therapy, or correct refractive errors by prescribing contact lenses and or eyeglasses.

An ophthalmologist, on the other hand also specializes in vision care and will also perform eye exams, diagnose and treat disease, prescribe medications and perform eye surgery. An optician will use prescriptions authorized by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist to fit and sell your eyeglasses.

Understanding LASIK

So, when is LASIK vision correction necessary, who performs the procedure, what vision problems can the surgery treat, and most importantly, is it safe especially for seniors? Short for laser-assisted in-situ keratomileuses, LASIK is an FDA approved procedure that has proven to be a very safe and effective way to treat and correct common vision problems such as astigmatism, near and farsightedness.

While LASIK may not be suitable for people with strong lens prescriptions, such as a high degree of short-sightedness, however, the eye laser surgery can also be used to correct an aging effect that makes it hard for an individual to focus on things up-close using a technique known as monovision LASIK.

What To Expect During LASIK Procedure

The most important goal of eye laser surgery is to alter the shape of the cornea, so it does a better job of focusing images onto the retina for sharper vision. An eye surgeon performs LASIK using a cool, non-thermal beam of light that is computer controlled. The procedure doesn’t hurt because the surgeon places anesthetic eye drops in your eye first, then proceeds to cut across the cornea of the eye, raises a flap of tissue and carries out reshaping to correct your vision. While the entire procedure takes approximately 15 minutes per eye, the laser treatment only takes less than a minute.

People who qualify for eye laser surgery report an immediate improvement in their vision with no complications or side effects and because there’s usually no stitches or bandages required after eye laser surgery, recovery is also very quick. Therefore, anyone over 18 years and meets the requirements can benefit from LASIK procedure, this includes seniors too.

Are You Eligible For LASIK?

An eye care specialist can help you determine your eligibility for LASIK, but the general guidelines are:

  • You must be 21 years and older and have healthy eyes, which means your eyes must not have any conditions that will affect postoperative healing, including eye infections, severe dry eye, glaucoma, cataracts, a degenerative or autoimmune disease
  • Your vision must also be stable for at least a year before surgery
  • Pregnant or nursing women are not eligible as hormonal levels can affect the shape of the eye

Therefore, consider eye laser surgery if you are tired of fumbling with contact lenses or eyeglasses and you meet the above requirements.

If you are looking to reduce or even get rid of your eye glasses and/or contacts let us at Rohr Eye & Laser Center help you! We offer several types of LASIK eye surgery including PRK, AK, CK, Cataracts surgery and more. We perform all these eye laser treatments with state of the art equipment. We are a leader in laser vision correction, and our goal is to help you achieve superior vision. Contact us today or view our website http://www.michiganlasik.com/  to schedule an appointment.

 

Thinking of having laser eye surgery? Here’s all you need to know

Considering laser eye surgery? Lisa Salmon looks at who the procedure is suitable for, how it’s done, and what the risks and benefits are

You’re most likely to be suitable for laser eye surgery if your glasses prescription is within specific ranges
 

IF YOU’RE sick of wearing glasses or contact lenses, the only other option to achieve clear vision is laser eye surgery – a procedure now thought to account for around 75 per cent of UK surgical procedures.

Such operations, which are also known as refractive surgery or laser vision correction (LVC), correct eye problems such as short sight, long sight and astigmatism, using a laser to reshape the front of the eye, which improves the ability to focus.

It’s an increasingly popular option for people with sight problems – the Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCOphth) says more than 100,000 refractive surgery procedures are performed every year in the UK.

However, surgery to correct the need for glasses or contact lenses isn’t currently available on the NHS, and it also isn’t covered by private health insurance.

Private clinics charge from £595 up to £2,175 per eye, depending on the type of procedure, so it’s a big investment that needs careful, well-informed consideration.

:: Who is laser eye surgery suitable for?

Most people aged over 18 can have laser eye surgery, as long as they’ve had a stable spectacle prescription for at least two years. Short sight typically stablises by late teens or early twenties.

Around 99 per cent of people in a large recent study published in the Review of Ophthalmology said they were satisfied with the result of their laser treatment, and for the small minority of patients with a poor outcome, revision treatment is normally effective.

You’re most likely to be suitable for laser eye surgery if your glasses prescription is in the range of :

:: Up to –10.00D of myopia or short sight

:: Up to +4.00D of hyperopia or long sight

:: Up to ±6.00D of astigmatism.

Patients may not be suitable for LVC if they have other eye conditions including cataracts, or problems with their eye surface.

:: Other surgical options

Allan explains that implant-based techniques may be more suitable for some patients.

Lens implantation techniques have two main categories: refractive lens exchange (RLE), which is identical to cataract surgery where the natural lens is replaced with a lens implant, and phakic intraocular lenses (PIOLs), where artificial lenses are implanted in front of the natural lens without replacing it. This is often used in younger patients where the spectacle prescription is outside the normal range for laser eye surgery.

:: How do you choose a clinic?

The Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCOphth) advises potential patients to think carefully before having refractive surgery. The RCOphth has a helpful

checklist on its website (rcophth.ac.uk) that you can use in the consultation with the refractive surgeon.

Patients are strongly advised to choose a surgeon on the General Medical Council’s specialist register in ophthalmology (gmc-uk.org), or who has the Cert LRS qualification, which can be checked via the Royal College of Ophthalmologists.

Also, make sure the hospital or clinic is regulated with the relevant regulator for the area of the UK it’s based in.

The clinic should be clear from the start about the total cost of the procedure. This normally includes follow-up clinic visits and treatment for any problems resulting from surgery. Additional laser treatments to fine-tune the visual result, for two years after surgery, are normally included in the initial cost.

:: What happens during the surgery?

The treatment is usually carried out on both eyes during the same visit, and takes a around 30 minutes, although the laser is applied for only a minute or two. All procedures use anaesthetic drops to keep patients comfortable, and a spring clip is used to hold the eyelids apart.

Patients will be asked to look up at a target light during the treatment to help keep the eye in the right position, and lasers are then used to remove a lens-shaped piece of tissue to reshape the cornea beneath. While the three available treatments involve slightly different methods, all have similar results.

Patients can go home on the same day as surgery, with antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drops to help the eyes heal.

:: Risks and side-effects

Permanent loss of vision is rare after LVC, and the main risk is that further surgery may be needed for optimum results – up to one in 10 patients require some form of additional surgery.

In the early period after surgery, patients may see glare, halos, starbursts and ghost images, but such problems usually resolve within a few months. There may also be intermittent blurring, temporary red blotches on the eyes, and dry eye symptoms, which can be treated with artificial tears, and should get better within a few months.

:: What results can you expect?

Most patients are satisfied with the outcome of surgery. Although glasses may still be needed for some activities after treatment, particularly for reading in older patients, Bruce Allan, consultant ophthalmic surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, says: “A reasonable expectation is to have vision at the same level as you get in soft contact lenses, but without having to wear them.

“Another way of putting it is that you should see at least as well as a normal non-spectacle wearer.”

Original Source: https://www.irishnews.com/lifestyle/2018/01/17/news/thinking-of-having-laser-eye-surgery-here-s-all-you-need-to-know-1232879/

Original Author: Lisa Salmon

What is Hyperopia and What Are the Correction Options?

Having the ability to see well is one of the essential requirements of living but few people actually have 20/20 vision. One of the most common problems is Hyperopia. Hyperopia is basically farsightedness. It’s one of the most common eye problems. It can not only affect your vision but also your overall well being and your quality of life, as your daily efficiency is decreased. Basically, you’ll be able to see objects well in the distance, while your vision will be blurrier closer up. This is also a problem that develops as you get older.

 

It may be time to visit an eye doctor to see how this problem can be corrected. Eye doctors will diagnose your Hyperopia. This condition can develop when the distance between your cornea and retina is too short. This basically displaces light rays instead of the image settling onto your retina; it will place it behind it. This creates vision problems. This condition can also be hereditary, so if your parents have farsightedness, most likely you do too. Usually people get this condition in their childhood.

Hyperopia Symptoms

If you are having any of the following issues, a trip to the eye doctors may be in order. Do you have a hard time reading books? Perhaps you have trouble when doing sewing, crafting, or cooking. You can have severe headaches and nausea when trying to complete these tasks. Yet you may still be able to see mountains in the distance. You may have no trouble driving, as you can see street signs, lights, and other vehicles easily.

Choosing LASIK

Eye doctors will test your eyes to diagnose your condition. You may be prescribed eye glasses or contact lenses for vision correction. One other solution, which is more permanent, is to have eye laser surgery. LASIK surgery is one option that can be done at the eye doctors’ clinic. It can not only correct Hyperopia but myopia and astigmatism too. Basically all of these conditions are caused by the shape of the eyes.

 

One thing that eye laser surgery still isn’t good at correcting is Presbyopia, which is caused by the hardening and thickening of the eye’s lenses.  Perhaps one of the best reasons for vision correction by eye laser surgery is so that you can read again without using glasses or contact lenses. You’ll also discover how your headaches and nausea will go away.

 

Modern LASIK surgery will correct reading problems. Some people have different vision problems in each eye, so each will be carefully evaluated. One eye may require different treatment than the other. Your eye doctors will advise you on the best course of treatment so you can regain your 20/20 vision.

Looking for the Right Solution

If you are suffering from Hyperopia and tired of not being able to see up close without reading glasses, or you are always feeling unwell, please book an appointment at our eye doctors today. Eye laser surgery will correct your vision so you can now focus on the world both sharply and clearly.

 

If you are looking to reduce or even get rid of your eye glasses and/or contacts let us at Rohr Eye & Laser Center help you! We offer several types of LASIK eye surgery including PRK, AK, CK, Cataracts surgery and more. We perform all these eye laser treatments with state of the art equipment. We are a leader in laser vision correction, and our goal is to help you achieve superior vision. Contact us today or view our website http://www.michiganlasik.com/  to schedule an appointment.

 

The Latest Laser Eye Surgery Innovation Shaking Up The Health Industry – And Anyone Can Do It

One of our most cherished senses has to be the gift of sight. For a start, you’d not be reading this article without it. But as any glasses wearer will tell you, how nice it would be to not always worry about ensuring you have two heavy rims filled with glass hanging off your face all day. Then there’s the additional concern of leaving them behind when you’ve had to take them off for whatever reason.

These were all things that haunted me as a glasses wearer. I’d only discovered I needed to wear them at the age of 26 (about four years ago) after trying on a friend’s pair of specs as a joke, and hastily realising I could see the world in HD. Really.

While I didn’t actually mind wearing my glasses all that much in terms of how they looked on me, I did find it irritating to have to keep them on my face to watch TV in the evening after wearing them all day. My nose used to ache bang on schedule around the 7pm mark, and then whenever I wanted to do exercise I’d just leave them in the gym locker room, making sure I was at the front of the exercise class so I could see everything the instructor was doing.

ReLEx SMILE laser eye surgery will destroy all myths associated with the procedure

Alternatives

The only real alternative to not needing to wear glasses is contact lenses. These, for me, weren’t really an option, though, as I had tried them many times with no success. Most likely because I was quite squeamish when it came to going anywhere near my actual eye ball (something that is required more than once a day when wearing contacts, ergh) and I felt sick every time I went to put them in. My natural reaction was to flinch and move away when my finger got close to my face. As you can imagine, contacts for me were therefore not a suitable alternative to wearing glasses.

The only other option, then, was laser eye surgery. Gulp. And probably not a great idea for someone who is squeamish when it comes to the eyes.

Laser eye surgery has been around for quite some time now, and has become such a low risk and relatively easy-to-execute procedure that it can be conducted relatively quickly, and recovery is limited to around a month. However, if you look around you’ll find generally the procedure is still rather invasive. The most common practice – LASIK, or “laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis” – involves having flaps cut by the laser on each eye, and the shape of the cornea altered in order to “correct” you of your bad vision. This is not an option for those that are a little delicate when it comes to touching the eye area. And for this rather gruesome-sounding reason, many glasses-wearers are put off going under the laser to rid them of their glasses for life.

And then there’s also plenty of myths surrounding the procedure that still exist from yesteryear, which doesn’t help with peoples’ perceptions, even now. As pointed out by Prof. Reinstein, here are 16 of the most common myths associated with laser eye surgery in general:

1. it’s still very new and the field is still developing so it’s worth waiting

2. It doesn’t work very well; you still need glasses after the procedure

3. It cannot correct long-sightedness

4. It cannot correct astigmatism

5. It cannot correct the need for reading glasses as you get older – Presbyopia

6. You could end up blind

7. It hurts

8. If you blink or move during the procedure it can go wrong

9. If something goes wrong there is nothing that can be done

10. It doesn’t last very long and needs redoing

11. We don’t know about the long-term safety

12. Prescription has to be stable

13. If you get a cataract later on in life, you can’t have that done anymore

14. Contact lenses are safer than laser eye surgery

15. Night vision is harmed by laser eye surgery (it can be fixed by laser eye surgery)

16. My prescription is too high to be corrected (98 percent of all prescriptions can be corrected)

And guess what. None of these are true.

Original Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/leebelltech/2018/01/25/the-latest-laser-eye-surgery-innovation-shaking-up-the-health-industry-and-anyone-can-do-it/#5d2948ed674a

Original Author: Lee Bell

Written Date: Jan 25 2018

This Is What Happens In Laser Eye Surgery

I was just having a conversation about laser eye surgery with my family and the debate on whether laser eye surgery is safe or not got heated, to say the least. Aiming lasers at the eye sounds really scary but it is a totally safe procedure. The aim of the procedure is to reshape the cornea of the eye in order to restore clarity in your vision. The aim of the procedure is to reshape the cornea of the eye in order to restore clarity in your vision.

Cathedral Eye Clinic

Laser eye surgery involves reshaping the cornea of the eye to correct for refractive errors.

The cornea of the eye is the front part of the eye which is transparent and essentially acts as a lens. The cornea as well as the lens in the eye refracts the incoming light and helps focus it onto the retina in the back of your eye. The images our eye see are actually upside down but our brain takes the image and flips them so that you interpret them as the ‘right way round’. Over time, some of us can develop visual problems and our sight can become blurred. One of the primary causes of blurred vision are refractive problems where the light isn’t focused on to the back of the eye well. This includes short and long sightedness as well as astigmatism.

One way this can be fixed is by laser eye surgery. So how does it work? The laser is focused onto the cornea to essentially heat up and evaporate the cells so that the cornea can be reshaped. The cornea has a mild lens effect which adds to the lens of the eye thus helping to correct for refractive errors.

LASIK, SMILE and surface laser treatments are the three main types of laser eye surgery:

Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) is a procedure that typically uses two lasers. One of the lasers is used to make a small flap in the cornea and then the other laser is used to reshape the cornea. The flap is then placed back over the cornea and left to heal without stitches. Normally an excimer laser is used which is an ultraviolet laser that uses a combination of a noble gas and reactive gas such as fluorine or chlorine (known as an excimer) as the gain medium. Noble gases do not typically react with much, however, when excited they briefly combine and emit electromagnetic radiation in the ultraviolet region. After this, the molecules disassociate and reabsorption of the ultraviolet rays does not occur. The pulses generated last for only a quadrillionth of a second.

Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (SMILE) laser eye surgery is a type of keyhole surgery where a small, self-healing hole is made. Laser pulses from an excimer laser are used to make bubbles that are less than 1/100th the width of a human hair in the cornea. Little connecting tunnels between these bubbles are then made with the laser so that the surgeon can extract the unwanted tissue. Since no flap is made, this procedure has a shorter recovery time.

Surface laser treatments like PRK, LASEK, and TransPRK are treatments which use an excimer laser to remove the ‘skin’ of the cornea so that it can be reshaped and is then left to grow back naturally. Therefore, these treatments typically have longer recovery times. All in all, it is stated that more than 95% of people who have had laser eye surgery are happy with the results.

Original Post: https://www.forbes.com/sites/meriameberboucha/2018/01/28/this-is-what-happens-in-laser-eye-surgery/#52c9c2e549a9

Original Date: Jan 28 2018

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