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Good News For The LASIK Industry

College of Optometry summer program works to boost diversity in eye care

For Isaiah Jordan, the desire to understand and heal the human eye led him to the field of optometry. But it was a special program for students considering optometry that led him to The Ohio State University.

Jordan is an alumnus of the College of Optometry’s Improving Diversity in Optometric Careers program. The three–day residential program is designed to attract ethnically underrepresented minority students to careers in optometry.

“Growing up, at least for me, I had never seen an African-American male doctor and I feel like that’s an issue,” Jordan said.

Jordan grew up in Columbus and graduated from Wright State University before attending the I-DOC program. He’s now in his third year in the university’s optometry school. He said diversity in the medical field makes a difference in patient care.

“I feel like it makes you a little bit more comfortable when you go and see a doctor to know that they are a little bit more in tune to you and your needs,” he said. “I guess it also makes you feel like you’re being listened to. It’s just overall more comfortable.”

Students in the I-DOC program come from colleges and universities across the country. The most recent class of more than two dozen students wrapped up on campus last week.

Students learn to dissect a cow eyeball

I-DOC students learn about new vision technology, eye diseases and new information about better eye care. Guest speakers include Ohio State graduates in the field of optometry. The participants receive information on the requirements for admission and the application process, and get a chance to ask questions of the alumni, faculty, staff and students of the College of Optometry.

Barbara Fink, professor of optometry and vision science, runs the I-DOC program said diversity plays an important role in improving the profession overall.

“It enriches us, it enriches our class. Making our class more diverse helps the class,” Fink said. “It also helps the profession. It helps students to be with other students who don’t look like them and come from different backgrounds for them to be better able to interact with and care for their patients. And it helps them when they leave to go out and serve a larger community.”

Joshua Simpo, a second-year student from the University of South Florida, attended the program this month. He said he found it to be informative and supportive. He said it also helps serve a critical mission.

“I think growing the ranks of diversity in any medical field is very important. But in optometry it’s even more important here because optometry is a subsection of medicine,” he said. “I think it’s important for us serving our community, it’s important for them to see people that look like them.”

Simpo said the I-DOC program has influenced where he will apply to continue his education.

“With the friendliness of the staff and the faculty, I do see myself coming to Ohio State as one of my number one options for optometry school. Before I was thinking of going somewhere a little closer to home but now that I see it, I’m really liking the vibe of the school,” he said.

Original Source: https://news.osu.edu/college-of-optometry-summer-program-works-to-boost-diversity-in-eye-care/

Original Author: Chris Booker – Ohio State News

 

Using Lasik to mend astigmatism

After many years of research and clinical testing, the ability to fix astigmatism with lasik eye surgery has finally materialized.

In order to comprehend this journey and understand how elimination of astigmatism is possible, it’s important to review some basics, such as understanding astigmatism, its manifestations as well as how lasers treat nearsightedness and astigmatism.

Astigmatism is a condition of the eye where the light beams reaching it come to focus at multiple points.

In a perfect eye, the beams should converge on a single point on the macula. This creates a crisp image.

In an eye suffering from astigmatism disease, the point is instead a blob, making the image blurry. The brain finds it difficult to interpret this unclear image, so it sends signals to the eye muscles to change the focus to sharpen the image. This futile exercise leads to fatigue, headaches and red eyes.

Astigmatism is caused when the horizontal and vertical curvatures of the eye are not similar. This shape imperfection could arise in the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) or the internal structures of the eye. Until now, identification of the source, the amoun, and the exact spread of astigmatism has been a challenge.

Recent advances in mapping the shape of the cornea and the wavefront of the eye have been a hallmark advance. Wavefront is the sum of all imperfections in the eye. It is best mapped by a device called iDesign wavescan studio, in which 1,287 beams of light are sent into the eye. They travel through the eye to the retina and bounce back to a computerized detector, which rapidly analyzes the shape and calculates the exact correction required along the 1,287 zones to get a perfect shape. This information is saved on a flash drive, which transfers the information to the latest generation of lasers.

Older lasers were broad beam, so each pulse could only treat an area of 6 mm. The latest cutting-edge laser beams can be reduced to smaller zones of 1 mm or less. The shape of the beam can also be matched to information obtained from the iDesign wavescan studio. These lasers are also able to detect any rotation in the eye, as well as track the eye during delivery of the beam. Hence they can treat vertical and horizontal planes differently.

Besides astigmatism, there are other aberrations called higher order aberrations, which are responsible for glare and fuzzy edges of objects. These cannot be corrected by glasses or older generation of lasers.

The good news is that even they may be reduced by the new advanced technology. Therefore, the incidence of nighttime glare and haloes are markedly reduced.

Corneal topography guided laser technology like Catz from Nidek and Contoura from Alcon work similarly; however, they are only limited to mapping the cornea. IDesign by Johnson and Johnson maps the cornea and the internal eye abnormalities. All three of these are FDA-approved technologies that have benefited consumers.

The modern advanced iDesign wavefront laser technology is much better than glasses and contact lenses for patients who have astigmatism. The lasers can cure the astigmatism and give sharp vision.

If you have waited for technology to fix astigmatism, the time has arrived.

Original Source: https://www.toacorn.com/articles/using-lasik-to-mend-astigmatism/

Written By:

Published On: Jul 12 2018

Patient age, corneal thickness need to be considered in laser eye surgery

The patient selection process is important to ensure positive outcomes.

Surgeons must take several patient factors into account when determining the appropriate laser eye surgery and ensuring the best outcomes.

LASIK is the preferred procedure for most patients at his practice, Peter S. Hersh, MD, FACS, told Ocular Surgery News, but factors such as a patient’s risk for ectasia, thin corneas, irregular topography and epithelial changes may make PRK the more appropriate procedure.

“In general, I prefer LASIK over PRK. It’s easier for patients, easier for re-treatment, and we also find in our practice that it is slightly more refractively predictable because there is less wound healing and epithelial remodeling component. With that as the baseline, I’d say we do about 75% LASIK and 25% PRK,” Hersh said. “One of the reasons I would do PRK: We’re very interested in keratoconus in my practice, and we obviously don’t want to put patients at risk of ectasia. Patients I’ll select for PRK typically have thinner corneas, which with LASIK would not leave a residual stromal bed (RSB) of more than 300 µm. I use 300 µm RSB, in general, as my cutoff, as well as a percentage of tissue altered of 40% of corneal thickness.”

Indications

Any irregularity on topography that does not point to an ectasia risk, which would rule out surgery, or a concern about keratoconus or ectasia because of a slight topography irregularity may be a reason for performing PRK instead of LASIK, Hersh said.

Patients who have minor corneal scars or a foreign body scar may be better suited for PRK, he said, as these irregularities may lead to vertical gas breakthrough during femtosecond flap creation. In addition, patients with epithelial basement membrane dystrophy are better treated with PRK in order to circumvent epithelial sloughing after LASIK and also to treat the dystrophic material itself.

“All of that having been said, the results of LASIK are exceptional, and we’ll treat patients from +4 D upwards to –8 D or –10 D, given that all the corneal variables are appropriate. Obviously, if they have thinner corneas or higher corrections, we may not want to do the treatments and we’ll move to something like a phakic IOL. But with current technologies, we have excellent results with LASIK along those parameters as well as up to 6 D of astigmatism, which we have treated successfully in post-corneal transplant patients,” he said.

Age can also be a factor in patient selection, as those with signs of early cataracts may be more appropriate to move into lens treatment rather than a corneal surgery. In addition, high corrections in association with very flat baseline corneal curvature may lead a surgeon to avoid corneal surgery, Hersh said.

Hyperopic patients

Hyperopic patients typically have excellent results after LASIK, Hersh said.

“We probably treat higher hyperope patients than a lot of other people do. I find in a presbyopic population with hyperopia, the inherent aberration profile one gets with a hyperopic treatment actually corrects for a lot of their near vision. They’re enjoying better near vision than a native cornea would in the same patient with presbyopia,” he said.

Instead of a presbyopic LASIK approach for myopic patients, Hersh said he will typically do “some mini-monovision, usually with about 0.75 D overcorrection of the hyperopes and about 0.75 D to 1 D undercorrection in the myopes.”

“In most cases, I don’t think you actually need a lot more than that to give them a functional near-point vision. We’ve moved away from a presbyLASIK approach. We used to do a fair amount of that, where we’d model a hyperprolate pattern onto the cornea. I’m finding the mini-monovision approaches work so well that we’re rarely doing a presbyLASIK approach,” he said.

“In older patients, if there is concern about epithelial healing and ocular surface integrity, I still prefer LASIK over PRK. LASIK can preserve the epithelium and offers less risk for epitheliopathy and aberrant healing after the procedure,” Hersh said. “In our experience, the incidence of LASIK-associated dry eye has decreased markedly with the use of thin femtosecond laser flaps.”

“I find myself actually moving away from PRK and more toward LASIK in those cases,” he said. – by Robert Linnehan

Original source: https://www.healio.com/ophthalmology/refractive-surgery/news/print/ocular-surgery-news/%7Ba7662563-c10e-4198-bb9f-eb637231c419%7D/patient-age-corneal-thickness-need-to-be-considered-in-laser-eye-surgery

Written by: Ocular Surgery News U.S. Edition

Original Date: May 25 2018

 

Avoid Lasik side effects

Side effects of Lasik eye surgery have prevented many from undergoing the procedure.

Take, for example a 37-yearold talent agent from Hollywood. He hated glasses and could not tolerate contact lenses. He even had the money to do the procedure. The only thing stopping him was that his uncle had the procedure 20 years earlier and had a lot of side effects.

This was food for thought, but it was also a lead-in to discussing how modern technology has decreased the incidence of side effects and the best way to prevent them.

The side effects from Lasik stem from causes before surgery, during the procedure and afterward. I explained to him that once we understand the cause, elimination becomes a matter of will and dedication.

Before surgery

Age of patient: The best age for Lasik eye surgery is from 21 to 45. Younger patients can undergo laser vision correction, but steps must be taken to determine stability of vision. Otherwise the effect of surgery will wear off.

Refractive stability: It is important that vision has stabilized and the eyeglass prescription has stayed the same for at least a year. However, minor variations are to be expected and are even allowed by the FDA.

Ruling out the effect of other medical conditions: diabetes and autoimmune diseases like thyroiditis may lead to increased side effects such as delayed healing of the surface layer.

Shape of the cornea: The shape of the cornea should be within normal ranges. If the cornea is thin or abnormal it could bulge after surgery, which would affect the outcome of the procedure.

Dry eye: This is present in a lot of individuals, especially those living in warm, dry climates like Southern California. Older individuals, postmenopausal women and anyone taking multiple medications are predisposed to a lack or poor quality of tears. Dry eyes must be resolved before Lasik is done.

During the procedure

Automated versus manual data entry: Manual entry for data needed to perform the surgery was found to be the most common source of error in one study. Newer automated wavescan systems eliminate data entry errors. The technology is used to collect information about the patient’s eye and create a correction plan to be used during surgery.

Calibration and accuracy of laser: Choosing a doctor one can trust is paramount because it is difficult to analyze behind-thescene actions. The best centers keep the laser well-calibrated and under maintenance contract with the manufacturing company.

Sterility of equipment: This is a no-brainer but is sometimes neglected at greedy centers.

After Lasik surgery

Immediate assessment of flap: Within an hour the surgeon needs to check the flap placement. Adjustments should be done to prevent long-term problems.

Doctor should check within 24 to 48 hours for inflammation or infection: This should not be neglected. It often gets omitted when the operating doctor is different from the one doing the postoperative checkups.

Original Source: https://www.toacorn.com/articles/avoid-lasik-side-effects/

Original Date: May 16 2018

Written By:

Visual impairment – How to improve your vision

Visual impairment is when the ability to see is decreased and cannot be fixed by usual means such as glasses, contact lenses, laser surgery.

אילוסטרציה

shutterstock

 The quality of our vision depends on 2 factors:

The quality of the image that is transferred from the eyes to the brain- the optics. The quality of the image processing in the brain.

Vision may be impaired due to a variety of reasons. Some include eye disease, failure of the brain to receive and read the visual cues sent by the eyes etc.

Most of the means that are available for vision impairment are devices that influence the visual-optical system, such as glasses contact lenses and some of the low vision aids. Surgeries (cataract surgery, laser surgery), influence the optical system as well. RevitalVision Eye Exercises are designed to improve eyesight in patients suffering from a broad range of eye conditions and diseases such as Adult Amblyopia (Lazy Eye), enhancing vision after cataract surgery, improving low vision, enhancing vision after Lasik surgery, Nystagmus, treatment for postponing the need for reading glasses and low myopia.

Illustration shutterstock

Amblyopia (lazy eye)

Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects at least 2% of most populations and can lead to permanently reduced vision if not detected and treated within a specific period in childhood. RevitalVision Lazy Eye exercises are done by stimulating specific areas in the brain, which create new connections between the neurons. As a result of brain plasticity, these changes can occur after the critical age of 8-9 years, which means that Adult Lazy Eye can be cured using RevitalVision Lazy Eye exercises method.

Iltestration shutterstock

RevitalVision Cataract surgery recovery exercises

The difficulty in vision after artificial lens implants results from a significant decrease in contrast sensitivity, and from the brain’s need to adapt to the new image coming from the eye. Contrast sensitivity decreases with age and after cataract surgery. Decrease in contrast sensitivity include symptoms such as difficulty with night vision, difficulty detecting stains on clothes or dishes, difficulty distinguishing facial expressions and a need of more lighting while reading. RevitalVision eye exercises improve contrast sensitivity post cataract surgery by over 150% on average and help to adjust to the new vision, by influencing the vision processing ability in the brain. This goal is reached by Revitalvision eye exercises, practiced at home in front of the computer.

Nystagmus treatment

Nystagmus is a repetitive, uncontrolled movement of the eyes. These movements often result in reduced vision and depth perception. RevitalVision exercises are designed according to the needs of each individual based on specific stimulation. Gabor patches stimulate specific areas in the brain so that it can maximize its efficiency from the information received from the eye. The effect obtained by RevitalVision eye exercises is an improvement of 2.5 lines and a 100% improvement in contrast sensitivity.

Presbyopia

Natural effects of aging cause a decline in near vision resulting in the need for reading glasses or bifocals. Customers and clinical trial participants who have completed the presbyopia program have experienced improved eyesight and quality of life, including reading without glasses, reading smaller print – on a newspaper, menu or computer screen. Reading better – in low contrast or challenging conditions like reading street signs on the move.

Post LASIK program

Blurred vision from the eyes can be improved by enhancing brain visual processing. To fine-tune the results of LASIK (refractive surgery), RevitalVision trains your brain to see better without additional surgery.

Low myopia

Or near-sightedness is a vision defect caused by the shape and length of the eye. Near-sighted people can see close objects clearly and distant objects appear out of focus. Thousands of customers and clinical trial participants who have completed the RevitalVision low myopia program have experienced improved eyesight and quality of life, including: Reading subtitles on TV, reading signs in the street and recognizing faces from a distance.

RevitalVision eye exercises are practiced at home in front of the computer and last approximately 30 minutes, under the supervision of an optometrist or ophthalmologist. More than 85% of patients who were candidates for this treatment and completed its course improved their visual acuity by 2.5 rows and showed 100% improvement in their contrast sensitivity. RevitalVision eye exercises train the brain to see better without the use of medications, without the necessity of surgery and with no side effects. These eye exercises have been proven their efficacy clinically and scientifically.

Original Source: http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/245704

Original Date: 5/10/18

Written By: B. Optom Yonina Thee

Glaucoma is painless and can go unnoticed

Known as the silent blinding disease, Glaucoma is the second most common cause for blindness globally, accounting for almost eight per cent of blindness cases.

BENGALURU:  Known as the silent blinding disease, Glaucoma is the second most common cause for blindness globally, accounting for almost eight per cent of blindness cases.

In India, glaucoma is the main cause for permanent blindness leaving at least 12 million people affected and more than one million people totally blind. Unfortunately, more than 90 per cent of glaucoma cases remain undiagnosed in the community.

Glaucoma is actually an eye disease that causes damage of the optic nerve progressively and at the point where the nerve leaves the eye to carry visual information to the brain. It occurs due to a fluid build up (pressure) within the eye that causes damage to the optic nerve. The eye makes a fluid called aqueous humor and as new aqueous flows into the eye, the same amount should get drained out. This is called the intraocular pressure that keeps the vision intact.

If the pressure continues to build up, the optic nerve and other parts of the eye will be damaged resulting in vision loss. As the optic nerve fibers get affected, the person may develop blind spots in the eye and ultimately become blind.

There are many types of glaucoma:

Primary open angle glaucoma: This is the most common type of glaucoma and occurs when the eye does not drain fluid normally. Consequently, there is an eye pressure build-up that damage the optic nerve. Unfortunately, this kind of glaucoma does not give any indication before and is also painless. The only option is to get regular check-ups done to detect early damage. Also, some people are sensitive to even normal eye pressure and they are susceptible to getting glaucoma.

Angle-closure glaucoma: When a person’s iris is very close to the drainage angle in the eye, the iris itself blocks the draining and can cause damage. This is usually an emergency attack because there are no symptoms at first. This requires immediate medical care, failing which can lead to blindness. But this condition gives some symptoms, unlike primary open-angle glaucoma. Some of the symptoms are blurred vision, eye pain, headache, nausea and seeing halos around lights.

Normal tension glaucoma: This is the third type where people with normal eye pressure also develop blind spots and blurred vision.

Glaucoma suspects: There are people that have higher than normal eye pressure and are called as glaucoma suspects. They have a higher risk of developing glaucoma and so should be monitored regularly.

Congenital glaucoma: This occurs due to increased eye pressure in young children. The cause is usually a genetic disorder.

Diagnosis

Glaucoma can be diagnosed only with a complete eye examination that involves measuring eye pressure, examining the eye drainage angle, studying the optic nerve and the damage done to it and measuring the thickness of the cornea.

Treatment

The usual treatment for glaucoma is daily use of eye drops which will lower the eye pressure. It can be done through two ways: either by reducing the amount of aqueous fluid in the eye or by helping the eye drain the fluid better. There are two main types of laser surgery to treat glaucoma. They help aqueous drain from the eye.

There are special surgical procedures too to treat glaucoma:

Trabeculoplasty: This is for people who suffer from open-angle glaucoma. A laser is used to make the drainage angle free from fluids and so the eye pressure is reduced.

Iridotomy: This procedure is for people who suffer from angle-closure glaucoma. The surgeon makes a tiny hole in the iris so that the fluid flow is normal.

There is another more complex surgery where the surgeon creates a new draining channel for the fluid so that pressure is normalised. Sometimes the surgeon uses a glaucoma drainage tube in the eye that sends the fluid to a collection area which is then absorbed into the blood vessels directly.

Original Source: http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/bengaluru/2018/apr/18/glaucoma-is-painless-and-can-go-unnoticed-1803334.html

Original Date: April 18 2018

Written By: Dr Poonam Yadav

14 Things I Learned When Getting LASIK Eye Surgery

Hi everyone! We’re Arielle and Jamie, and we both recently got LASIK and PRK eye surgery (respectively).

What is LASIK and PRK? It’s an elective eye surgery used to improve your vision for (ideally) an extended period of time. However, the surgeries have their differences.

LASIK: With LASIK, the surgeon creates a protective flap in the cornea with a laser or a blade. The flap of tissue is lifted and the laser reshapes the inner layers of the cornea to repair imperfections that lead to distorted vision. The corneal flap is then put back and heals relatively quickly, usually within a couple days. PRK: With PRK, no corneal flap is created. Instead, the outer layer of the cornea is removed and the laser reshapes it to correct vision. Because the cornea has to grow back, the healing process is more painful and intensive (but more effective). Once the PRK surgery is completed, the doctor places a temporary contact lens, which is used as a bandage on the eye for improved comfort. PRK is a better choice for people with thin corneas or chronic dry eyes.Read the differences between LASIK and PRK.

Getty

LASIK: With LASIK, the surgeon creates a protective flap in the cornea with a laser or a blade. The flap of tissue is lifted and the laser reshapes the inner layers of the cornea to repair imperfections that lead to distorted vision. The corneal flap is then put back and heals relatively quickly, usually within a couple days.

PRK: With PRK, no corneal flap is created. Instead, the outer layer of the cornea is removed and the laser reshapes it to correct vision. Because the cornea has to grow back, the healing process is more painful and intensive (but more effective). Once the PRK surgery is completed, the doctor places a temporary contact lens, which is used as a bandage on the eye for improved comfort. PRK is a better choice for people with thin corneas or chronic dry eyes.

We learned some things to make the recovery process a little easier, and we wanted to share our tips from both perspectives.

Remember that not all surgeries and recoveries are the same. Some people have complications, some people don’t. This isn’t necessarily a reflection of how your experience will be, we’re just sharing ours.

Disclaimer: Please always consult an ophthalmologist before making any changes or taking suggestions!

1. Meal prep before surgery.

Instagram: @ariellesays, Jamie Urso

Arielle: The thought of cutting apples after surgery is both laughable and terrifying. I’m glad I had everything done and all I had to do was grab my food from the fridge.

Jamie: I don’t normally meal prep so instead I just loaded up on some of my favorite comfort foods from Whole Foods (mainly gluten-free vegan mac & cheese and Siete chips).

2. Or pre-order delivery to avoid cooking.

Arielle: I didn't actually do this, but I thought about ordering Indian later in the day, but didn't want to mess around with my phone screen. This would have been ideal.Jamie: I also didn't do this, my groceries were all I needed/wanted.

seamless.com

Arielle: I didn’t actually do this, but I thought about ordering Indian later in the day, but didn’t want to mess around with my phone screen. This would have been ideal.

Jamie: I also didn’t do this, my groceries were all I needed/wanted.

3. Put your eye drops in the fridge.

Arielle: OMG this gave my eyes such relief throughout the day.Jamie: I agree, this was such a nice little relief, felt so good.

Arielle Calderon

Arielle: OMG this gave my eyes such relief throughout the day.

Jamie: I agree, this was such a nice little relief, felt so good.

4. Take a shower and wash your hair the morning of your surgery

Arielle Calderon, Jamie Urso

Arielle: For LASIK, they tell you not to wet your eyes for a few days. I thought it would be easier to just shower morning of and not shower the next day (sorry).

Jamie: With PRK the initial post-surgery recovery was INTENSE and I really didn’t want to do anything, I basically slept for two days straight, so showering was out of the question (not sorry).

5. Download audiobooks, music, or podcasts since you can’t really look at screens.

itunes.apple.com, itunes.apple.com, Via open.spotify.com

Arielle: I only had to avoid screens for a day, but let me tell you, it can be SO BORING. Having podcasts was the only thing keeping me from going crazy. I mainly listened to Matt Bellassai’s Unhappy Hour and Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness.

Jamie: I was also advised to stay off screens and away from light in general as much as possible, but the sound of people talking actually made me feel worse. I opted for some really nice mellow music that I had on repeat. It was so soothing and calming it really helped me feel better.

6. Eat a filling meal before your surgery.

Instagram: @ariellesays, Jamie Urso

Arielle: For me, I had to be at the doctor’s office for three hours (paperwork, payment plan, waiting for the Valium to kick in, the surgery, relaxing after, etc.). I also just wanted to nap right when I got home, so the fuller I was, the less cranky.

Jamie: I don’t actually remember eating before the surgery, I’m sure I had a bar or something, but I was only at the doctor for 45 minutes so I wasn’t that concerned I was going to get hungry like Arielle. I was hungry when I got home though and had all my groceries waiting for me.

7. If you have pets, consider having a family member or friend take care of them for the day or next few days.

Arielle Calderon, Jamie Urso

Arielle: I have a cat, and I was actually fine with her. I had shields on the whole day so I wasn’t really getting hair in my eyes. But my doctor also advised not to take pets out for a walk the first day.

Jamie: This was a definite must for me. I have a dog (named Pasta, how cute is she?) and there is NO WAY I would have been able to take her out for walks within those first few days. Luckily my parents live close by and love taking care of her so she stayed with them until I was better.

8. Ask someone to take you home and get you settled.

Arielle Calderon, Jamie Urso

Arielle: For LASIK, the healing isn’t that intense and they tell you that you’re able to go home alone. But I asked my friend, and I’m glad I did. I was stumbling a little from the Valium and walking to the cab was sensitive on my eyes since it was bright out.

Jamie: This was a must for PRK, I was also given Valium to keep me relaxed during the procedure and to help me sleep after. If I could do it over, I’d actually have someone with me for the first 24 hours. In addition to Valium, I was prescribed to take strong pain pills when I got home (and over the next few days as needed) which made me very tired and loopy. It would have been nice to have someone helping me with drops, making food and to comfort me since the pain was bad. With PRK I wanted nothing more than to keep my eyes closed and be in complete darkness for the first two days so I kind of lost track of what day/time it was. It’s not a necessity, but something I’d recommend to anyone doing PRK.

9. When you need preservative-free eye drops, try getting one with a resealable cap so you can take them on-the-go.

Refresh Optive, Systane Ultra

Arielle: I used Refresh Optive and it was great because you can reseal the caps. I didn’t want the other ones to drip in my bag and go to waste so this worked out great.

Jamie: I used Systane Ultra Preservative Free Eye Drop. They were the vials, that’s what my doctor recommended. They were amazing.

10. Make your phone text bigger and turn down brightness.

Arielle: I did not do this and now thinking about it, this probably would have made life easier. I was in general trying to avoid screens anyway, though.Jamie: This is something I thought of on day two I think. I was off my phone as much as possible, but bigger text over the next few days just helped me focus less and not have to look at the phone too long.

Apple

Arielle: I did not do this and now thinking about it, this probably would have made life easier. I was in general trying to avoid screens anyway, though.

Jamie: This is something I thought of on day two I think. I was off my phone as much as possible, but bigger text over the next few days just helped me focus less and not have to look at the phone too long.

11. And if you have an iPhone, you can ask Siri to read your notifications or text people.

Arielle: I really only needed this for the day, but it was super helpful to just yell at Siri to send a text message. Also, you can tell Siri to play your music or podcasts too.Jamie: This was HUGE. I didn't think of doing it right away, but it's such a great feature. Siri read all my notifications and I was able to reply to text messages without needing to pick up my phone.

Apple

Arielle: I really only needed this for the day, but it was super helpful to just yell at Siri to send a text message. Also, you can tell Siri to play your music or podcasts too.

Jamie: This was HUGE. I didn’t think of doing it right away, but it’s such a great feature. Siri read all my notifications and I was able to reply to text messages without needing to pick up my phone.

12. Have Advil/Aleve/Tylenol available for headaches or pain.

Jamie Urso

Arielle: I didn’t really experience pain, but I did have a couple headaches. Just good to have on hand in case.

Jamie: One of the big differences between PRK and LASIK is the pain. The pain was bad. I was given prescription pain pills and numbing eye drops to use on the first two days only (when the pain was the worst.) After that since the pain was never that bad again but my doctor recommended taking ibuprofen for general pain management which helped a lot.

13. Buy paper plates and cups so you don’t have to do dishes.

Arielle: I did not do this but that definitely would have been easier lol.Jamie: This was another thing I thought of after the fact. It just would have made things easier.

Jamie Urso

Arielle: I did not do this but that definitely would have been easier lol.

Jamie: This was another thing I thought of after the fact. It just would have made things easier.

14. Invest in a good sleep mask.

instagram.com, Jamie Urso

Arielle: I personally didn’t use this because with LASIK, they gave me these plastic shields to tape to my face, so I just used that instead. However, I do plan to use my sleep mask from now on just for extra protection.

Jamie: I thought I had a sleep mask but couldn’t end up finding it when I needed it (of course) so I opted for a winter beanie that I could pull over my eyes. I just wanted pure darkness as much as possible.

15. Wear something comfortable to surgery so you can get home and go straight to bed.

Arielle Calderon, Jamie Urso

Arielle: THIS so hard. You will want to just go straight to sleep. Make it easier on yourself. It’s just surgery, you don’t need jeans for that.

Jamie: 100%. There’s a chance I wore the same comfy outfit for two days straight.

16. Buy a cold compress for some relief.

Arielle: I actually didn't even think of this, but I might give it a go??Jamie: Also this was so nice. I actually kept the cold compress in the fridge instead of in the freezer so it wasn't so cold I couldn't put it directly on my face. I still do this from time to time when I got to sleep. It's just nice.

Jamie Urso

Arielle: I actually didn’t even think of this, but I might give it a go??

Jamie: Also this was so nice. I actually kept the cold compress in the fridge instead of in the freezer so it wasn’t so cold I couldn’t put it directly on my face. I still do this from time to time when I got to sleep. It’s just nice.

17. REST REST REST. Do not try to go overboard, let your eyes heal.

Arielle Calderon, Jamie Urso

Arielle: I cannot stress this enough. Even though I could see, I wanted to go out and do things and watch TV right away. But the best thing you can do is take it easy and relax. These are your EYES — let them recover.

Jamie: This is probably the main similarity with PRK and LASIK — REST! You may want to be active or think it’s not that bad, but the first two days are critical. Stay inside, SLEEP, and stay away from light. Protect those eyes, they cost a lot of money now!

Arielle: Overall, I absolutely LOVE my LASIK procedure. It was scary (you know, because all surgeries have risks and the last thing I wanted was to go blind), but quick and relatively painless. The healing process was short and I haven't had any complications, just some dry eyes here and there. It's an expensive surgery, but completely worth it for me. You can read about my LASIK surgery for more information.Jamie: I still can't believe I got elective eye surgery. Like, what? The crazy thing is, I'd do it all over if I had to. I haven't had any complications and the result is incredible (I now have 20/15 vision). The whole experience was INTENSE, I will not sugar coat that. The first two days of recovery were very painful and hard, but by the end of day two/morning of day three, I was a new person with new eyes. It was expensive, but for me, it was an investment I was willing and able to make. I <3 PRK!

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Arielle: Overall, I absolutely LOVE my LASIK procedure. It was scary (you know, because all surgeries have risks and the last thing I wanted was to go blind), but quick and relatively painless. The healing process was short and I haven’t had any complications, just some dry eyes here and there. It’s an expensive surgery, but completely worth it for me. You can read about my LASIK surgery for more information.

Jamie: I still can’t believe I got elective eye surgery. Like, what? The crazy thing is, I’d do it all over if I had to. I haven’t had any complications and the result is incredible (I now have 20/15 vision). The whole experience was INTENSE, I will not sugar coat that. The first two days of recovery were very painful and hard, but by the end of day two/morning of day three, I was a new person with new eyes. It was expensive, but for me, it was an investment I was willing and able to make. I <3 PRK!

Original Source: https://www.buzzfeed.com/ariellecalderon/lasik-prk-tips?utm_term=.nhKWG71eD#.yy3z0X8xK

Original Date: April 29 2018

Why Rubbing Your Eyes Is Making You Look Old and Tired

It might seem harmless, but it’s actually adding years to your appearance.

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You’re exhausted after a long day at work. You find yourself slumped in your chair, head in your hands, when your hands slowly begin to creep toward your eyes. Next thing you know, you’re giving your eyes a good rub — and for some reason, you start to feel better.

Turns out, while it might feel pretty damn good, it might not be the best thing for you. While giving your eyes a quick occasional rub to relieve a brief itch is likely harmless, if you’re going to town rubbing them, you could be damaging your vision and making yourself look older.

Why does it feel so damn good to rub your eyes in the first place?

Touching your eyes before washing your hands
Getty Images

Typically, we feel the urge to rub our eyes when they’re itching or irritated—or simply because we’re feeling stressed, says Anupama B. Horne, M.D., chief for comprehensive ophthalmology at the Duke Eye Center.

“Rubbing stimulates tear production, which can help moisturize dry or tired eyes, and remove any irritating particles,” says Horne. “It can also initiate the oculocardiac reflex, in which pressure on the eyeball causes a slowing of the heart rate and leads to a feeling of stress reduction.”

That’s why you tend to feel better soon after a quick rub — slowing down your heart rate calms you down.

That said, rubbing too hard and too often can damage your eyes and the surrounding structures, explains Dr. Horne. If any dust, eyelashes, or foreign particles are on the surface of your eye, rubbing can lead to scratches on your cornea. A scratched cornea can hurt like hell. It feels like there’s something stuck in your eye that won’t come out, and often comes with tearing, redness, and sensitivity to the light as well.

Another issue with rubbing? You can break the blood vessels on the whites of your eyes, making them look bloodshot. In addition, rubbing can make the skin around your eyes darker — and bloodshot eyes with dark circles can make you look haggard and old beyond your years.

Can rubbing your eyes hurt your vision, too?

“On a deeper level, in some genetically or otherwise predisposed patients, excessive rubbing of itchy eyes can cause progressive thinning and shape change of the cornea, known as keratoconus,” says Dr. Horne.

Keratoconus can significantly decrease your vision. If that happens, you may even need surgery to improve it.

So how do you know if you’re rubbing too much? Take note of whether this eye rubbing is a habit for you. Are you rubbing your eyes every day? Every hour? If you wear contacts, beware rubbing with them in: you can move the contacts around and end up scratching your cornea with the contact.

People who have had LASIK surgery are also at a higher risk of infection from rubbing their eyes.

“LASIK procedures create a flap in the outer layers of the cornea, under which laser is administered to correct vision,” says Dr. Horne. “It is possible that if eyes are rubbed to hard following LASIK that this could cause complications with the flap leading corneal injury.”

Bottom line: Mom was right. If your eyes are bothering you, try some lubricating eye drops instead. And if you’re rubbing to relieve stress, try this stress-reducing breathing technique instead to calm down.

Original Source: https://www.menshealth.com/health/a19644102/rubbing-your-eyes-makes-you-look-old-and-tired/

Written By Maggie Niemiec

Eye-opening facts on cataract surgery

 

I REFER to the letter “Laser procedure involves extra cost and time” (The Star, March 6), expressing concerns over the report “Cataract surgery safer with laser” (The Star, March 4). The concerns focused mainly on the writer’s disbelief that Femtosecond Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS) is safer or faster than the conventional Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery (Phaco).

I have been an eye surgeon since the early 1990s. Over the years, I’ve witnessed the emergence of many surgical technologies in Asia including FemtoLASIK, Implantable Contact Lenses (ICL) and various cataract surgery technologies.

Though Phaco would become the standard of cataract practice worldwide after its introduction in 1967, much has changed since then. Phaco involves the surgeon manually creating cuts, openings and breaking the cataract with metal blades and instruments, which was ironically explained to patients as “laser” eye surgery.

FLACS resulted from the success of femtosecond laser technology used in laser eye surgery (Lasik) to create Lasik flaps in 2001. Similarly, when first introduced for Lasik, disbelieving surgeons continued to use blades to make Lasik flaps. Now, however, most Lasik centres use femtosecond laser technology for Lasik procedures, becoming the gold standard for it worldwide.

Approved for use in cataract surgery in 2009, FLACS effectively replaces some key steps performed manually by the surgeon during Phaco. This includes creating corneal incisions, opening the anterior lens capsule (capsulotomy) and dividing the cataract into smaller portions (lens fragmentation). FLACS is also able to correct astigmatism, the major cause of blurred vision.

Emergence of FLACS has changed cataract practice worldwide, allowing the surgeon to perform cataract surgery in a more predictable and precise manner. This increases the likelihood of getting the best outcome and safety, especially with complex cases.

More importantly, most of the procedure is completed before the surgeon even attempts to go into the eye – which is only possible with a laser.

In over 4,000 cases performed in my practice alone, FLACS proved to be highly beneficial for both surgeons and patients and without any significant complications or side effects. FLACS continues to improve alongside technological advancements, shortening the learning curve for surgeons and improving its outcomes.

Many of the reported risks stated in the aforementioned letter were transient (temporary) and mostly resolved now. FLACS incisions are rendered more accurate, predictable and reproducible. Moreover, the new-generation low pulse energy femtosecond laser enables the surgeon to easily open the corneal incision without a surgical blade (hence the term “no-blade cataract surgery”).

Though Phaco may take 15 minutes for experienced surgeons, the majority of cases may be longer, depending on the type of cataract and other factors. A surgeon may require minutes to break a mature cataract into pieces before its removal, but the laser is able to do it within seconds. In our practice, experienced surgeons have averaged around 15 minutes per surgery with FLACS.

In terms of complications and side effects, both FLACS and Phaco share similar incidences. However, FLACS remains a safe procedure for cataract treatment even for glaucoma patients. Prospective and randomised studies show that although there is a rise in intraocular pressure (IOP) when using a vacuum suction cup during FLACS, the effect was transient and well tolerated (not dangerous).

Furthermore, newer FLACS platforms have not only lowered IOP elevation rates but also reduced incidence of eye inflammation after surgery.

Advancement in FLACS technology has also enabled surgeons to create smooth-edged cuts, minimising the risk of radial tears. Additionally, with the liquid immersion interface, incidence of incomplete capsulotomies are eliminated, further reducing the risk of capsulotomy breakages.

With the OCT, capsulotomy has been rendered more precise and centred, resulting in better visual results especially for premium lenses such as multifocals and, more recently, trifocals.

Many clinical studies incorporating advancements in technology, techniques and data in FLACS have emerged to verify the efficacy and benefits outlined above. Scientific literature on FLACS has provided over 250 peer-reviewed articles including randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case reports and editorials by reputable experts and research bodies. This ensures balance and objectivity in the analyses of FLACS.

This is important as the use of any one study, without taking into account their design and/or sampling methods, may result in potentially misleading impressions and/or conclusions.

For example, the letter quoted the 2016 European Registry of Quality Outcome for Cataract and Refractive Surgery (EUREQUO) study as the largest in the world comparing FLACS and Phaco to date. In truth, this registry-based EUREQUO study compared only 2,814 FLACS eyes and 4,987 Phaco eyes (total of 7,801) and not 20,000 patients as stated.

After an even larger study (9,400 FLACS vs 8,779 Phaco cases), renowned ophthalmic surgeon Dr Thomas Kohnen reported in February 2017 to an international ophthalmology conference that FLACS does have better visual results and overall superior safety profile.

As the number of younger patients increases, expectations of their cataract surgery have also increased significantly. Mostly still working and more knowledgeable, their desire for spectacle-independence, better surgical results and faster recovery drives them to search for better technology and treatments.

While new technology comes with added cost, nonetheless we need to weigh it against the benefits it brings. Furthermore, as with any technology, there will be continuous improvements that render it even more effective and accessible to all.

Though most surgeons in Malaysia still use conventional Phaco, it does not mean they don’t agree that FLACS has its advantages. The major barrier to ultimately accepting FLACS is the high investment in time and money needed to implement it. In a time of evolving technology, it is our responsibility as medical advisers to guide patients with proper, updated and appropriate information to allow them to make informed decisions.

Original Source: https://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/letters/2018/04/09/eyeopening-facts-on-cataract-surgery/

How Long Does LASIK Last?


 
A patient undergoes LASIK surgery. BSIP/UIG Via Getty Images

If you’ve ever been saddled with eyeglasses so thick that the lenses look like Coke bottles glasses, you’ve probably considered LASIK surgery (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, to give it its full name), a fast, safe procedure that began proliferating throughout the United States in the 1990s. In just a few minutes, LASIK can correct eye problems like myopia (nearsightedness — you can only see up close), hyperopia (farsightedness — you can only see far away) and astigmatism (blurred vision). But some patients notice that months or years later their vision seems to worsen again. So how long does LASIK really last?

First, a little on how it works: In a LASIK procedure, a surgeon uses a high-precision blade called a microkeratome or an ultra-fast femtosecond laser to slice a corneal flap into the eye. Then, she lifts the flap to expose the corneal tissue, while an excimer laser reshapes the cornea by removing unwanted tissue. The flap settles back into place and heals within a few weeks. In the meantime, the patient immediately enjoys improved vision.

“The great thing about LASIK is that the results are permanent in the great majority of cases,” emails Eric Donnenfeld, M.D., an ophthalmologist, who has performed many eye surgeries, including LASIK. “Assuming a stable prescription, patients can expect their vision correction to last until age-related visual changes occur – typically after the age of 45 or 50, when most people will need reading glasses.” But, he said, medical conditions associated with aging, such as cataracts, may change vision many years after LASIK.

In a minority of cases, changes within the patient’s eyes – which would likely occur with or without LASIK – cause a reduction in visual acuity (sharpness of vision). This is called myopic regression. Those changes might happen within a year of the operation, or decades later. A quick touch-up procedure (called LASIK enhancement) often restores visual acuity.

There aren’t a lot of studies on myopic regression. Within a year or two of LASIK surgery, maybe 2 percent of patients need an enhancement procedure, according to the American Refractive Surgery Council. After about a decade, perhaps 10 percent of patients will need an enhancement procedure. Eric Donnenfeld notes that “patients with high refractive errors (very thick glasses) have a greater chance of needing an enhancement.”

According to Dr. Chris Blanton, medical monitor and consultant with Johnson & Johnson Vision, if your surgeon is using an advanced procedure called custom LASIK or wavefront LASIK, there’s a 98 percent chance that you’ll need just one procedure, and that’s it. Wavefront technology creates a 3-D image of the eye to use a guide in doing the LASIK surgery.

Touch-ups aren’t risk-free. “Like any surgical procedure there are risks, for example abnormal healing or infection,” says Blanton by email. But only a tiny number of patients encounter complications.

The eyes of younger patients tend to change more over time, and they’re more likely to notice a bit of blurriness as they age, even if they’ve had LASIK. Older patients’ eyes, and the surgical results, are often more stable, with the exception of presbyopia, the decline in close-up vision that naturally occurs with age and forces many middle-aged folks to wear bifocal glasses. Note that presbyopia comes as a result of changes to the lens of the eye, not to the cornea, which is what LASIK operates on.

Doctors say it’s not realistic to expect your laser-focused eyes to remain perfect for the rest of your life. After all, every part of the human body ages and changes, and the eyes are no exception. If you suffer regression after LASIK, and you don’t want to undergo (or pay for) a touch-up procedure, you’re not alone. Many people opt to wear prescription glasses for driving or reading. And of course, whether you’ve had LASIK or not, a yearly eye exam is a good idea to keep your health and your vision at its best.

Original Source: https://health.howstuffworks.com/human-body/systems/eye/long-does-lasik-last.htm

Original Date: April 5 2018

Original Author: Nathan Chandler